Text Size
Sunday, September 15, 2019

OK, HOW ARE WE RELATED?

Relationship Guide

Common Ancestor

Daughter Son

Grandson

Great Grandson

2G Grandson

3G Grandson

4G Grandson

5G Grandson

6G Grandson

Daughter Son

Brother Sister

Nephew Niece

Grand Nephew

G Grand Nephew

2G Grand Nephew

3G Grand Nephew

4G Grand Nephew

5G Grand Nephew

Grand son

Nephew Niece

FIRST COUSIN

1st Cousin 1 Rem

1st Cousin 2 Rem

1st Cousin 3 Rem

1st Cousin 4 Rem

1st Cousin 5 Rem

1st Cousin 6 Rem

Great Grandson

Grand Nephew

1 Cousin 1-Rem

SECOND COUSIN

2 Cousin 1-Rem

2 Cousin 2-Rem

2 Cousin 3-Rem

2 Cousin 4-Rem

2 Cousin 5-Rem

2G Grandson

G Grand Nephew

1 cousin 2-Rem

2 Cousin 1-Rem

THIRD COUSIN

3 Cousin 1-Rem

3 Cousin 2-Rem

3 Cousin 3-Rem

3 Cousin 4-Rem

3G Grandson

2G grand Nephew

1 Cousin 3-Rem

2 Cousin 2-Rem

3 Cousin 1-Rem

FOURTH COUSIN

4 Cousin 1-Rem

4 Cousin 2-Rem

4 Cousin 3-Rem

4G Grandson

3G grand Nephew

1 Cousin 4-Rem

2 Cousin 3-Rem

3 Cousin 2-Rem

4 Cousin 1-Rem

FIFTH COUSIN

5 Cousin 1-Rem

5 Cousin 2-Rem

5G Grandson

4G grand Nephew

1 Cousin 5-Rem

2 Cousin 4-Rem

3 Cousin 3-Rem

4 Cousin 2-Rem

5 Cousin 1-Rem

SIXTH COUSIN

6 Cousin 1-Rem

6G Grandson

5G grand Nephew

1 Cousin 6-Rem

2 Cousin 5-Rem

3 Cousin 4-Rem

4 Cousin 3-Rem

5 Cousin 2-Rem

6 Cousin 1-Rem

SEVENTH COUSIN

TO USE

  1. Find the "CLOSEST in COMMON" ancestor, say Grampa Jones. He goes in the box called "Common Ancestor".
  2. Find "your" relationship with him, going "across the top of the chart". You are in "Grandson" box.
  3. Now, find the other person's box going "down" the "left side" of chart, let's say she goes in Great Grandaughter box.
  4. Now go down the line from your Grandson box; to the line that extends from her place till they intersect.
  5. You should be in the "1st Cousin 1-Rem" box. That is how you are related, "First Cousins once removed!"

Let's try it again!

  1. The Jones you just found is your Great Great Great Grandpa, He is your "CLOSEST in COMMON" ancestor" with John.
  2. Go right ACROSS till you find your "3G grandson" spot.
  3. John emails you and says, "That Jones guy is my Great Great Great Grandpa too.
  4. So, for John, go DOWN from "common ancestor" till you get to his "3G grandson" spot.
  5. Where these "2 lines" INTERSECT is your relationship with each other, you are "true Fourth Cousins"

See, it only looked hard!

5 Tips for Finding Female Ancestors

by LegacyTree Genealogies

https://legacytree.com/blog/5-tips-finding-female-ancestors/

“The husband and wife are one, and that one is the husband.” – William Blackstone, English jurist and judge

This quote was the legal and cultural reality under which American women lived during most of history, due to our heritage of English common law.

Blackstone’s quote above is in reference to an old concept called coverture, in which a woman’s rights and property were swallowed up in her husband’s when she married. The husband essentially became her guardian and representative, and with few exceptions, had sole power to buy and sell property, vote, sue in a court of law, and make decisions for the family.

With this background in mind, it is easy to understand why it can be difficult to find evidence of female ancestors, especially the further back one goes. For example, federal censuses pre-1850 listed only the names of the male heads of household (with the rare exception of those run by widows who had only minor children). Women in early American history were less likely to be literate and leave diaries or letters. Most wills were written by men with, again, the prime exception being widows who had been left property by their deceased husbands. And in most cases, women led quiet, domestic lives that left them out of the spotlight covered by contemporary historians.

So what are some things you can do in order to coax those hidden women out of the woodwork in your genealogical research?

1. Make a thorough search for marriage records.

2. Pay close attention to the people with whom your Mrs. and her husband interacted.

3. Search for obituaries even though these can be difficult to locate in the earlier days of our history.

4. Read county and local histories of the time as these can include biographical sections on early or prominent citizens of the area.

5. Read the actual records, such as land and wills, as woman may not have been able to sell land on her own, but she could appear in the deed books alongside of her husband or appear in the court records agreeing to sell land that was part of her dowry.

For more details of the above, click the URL provided at the beginning of this article.

Date Wanted

Known Information

Formula

Birth

Age at dated event

Subtract age from date
Add 5 years to each side
Search 11 year period

Birth

Marriage date

Subtract 16 years from date
Subtract 40 years from date
Search period between dates

Birth

Birth or Christening of child:
Female - only child

Subtract 16 years from date
Subtract 50 years from date
Search period between dates

Birth

Female - Several children

Subtract 16 years from date of first child
Subtract 50 years from date of last child
Search period between dates

Birth

Male - Only child

Subtract 16 years from date
Subtract 70 years from date
Search period between dates

Birth

Male - Several children

Subtract 16 years from date of first child
Subtract 70 years from date of last child
Search period between dates

Marriage

Age at dated event

Calculate age 15
Add 25 years to date
Search period between dates

Marriage

Birth or Christening of child: Only child

Subtract 34 years from date
Add 1 year to date
Search period between dates

Marriage

Several children

Subtract 34 years from date of last child
Add 1 year to date of first child
Search period between dates

Death

 

Calculate birth date
Add 90 years
Search period between date last known alive and 90th year

Who were the Hagler's?

The following analysis establishes what I know about the Hagler and Overton families of South Carolina and Georgia from the mid-1700s to the mid-1800s. The analysis encompasses related families in North Carolina and Tennessee. The primary focus will be to establish which Jacob Hagler is the father of Rebecca and Susannah Hagler.

1.

a. Rebecca (born 1798) and Susannah (born 1800) Hagler married in Jasper County, Georgia in 1817 to James and John Overton Junior, which is supported by official records in Georgia.

b. Susannah named her first born male child Jacob Hagler Overton, which implies that her maiden name is Hagler and Jacob is her Father’s name but could as well be her grandfather, but in this case, it is after her father based on a newspaper article in Arkansas.

c. Article in the Arkansas Democrat, dated 30 Oct 1921, written about Rebecca Ann Overton, the daughter of John Junior and Susannah, states that a Jake (Jacob) Hagler from Tennessee is her grandfather on her mother’s side. The Arkansas article pointed out that Jake lived until he was 112 years old.

d. Since Rebecca and Susannah were married in Jasper County, Georgia in 1817, it is highly probable that their father was living in or near Georgia in 1817. Normally the place of marriage occurs where the wife lives verses the husband.

2.

 There was only one Hagler living in Georgia in 1820 and he was Jacob Hagler who lived in Walton County, Georgia, and the Census record was (100001/1000101): one male under 10, Jacob 45+, one girl under 10, his wife 45+. In 1830 Jacob lived in Henry County (see item 11 below) on the 1830 Census (0001000010000/0000000010–). On this Census he and his wife were 60-70 years old and had one boy 15-20 living with them. Is this Jacob Hagler Rebecca and Susannah’s father? (See bullet 12 below)

a. Rebecca and Susannah both were born in South Carolina, Rebecca in 1798 and Susannah in 1800. This information is supported by information captured on the Census records, but the birth years could be off by +/- one year.

b. Based on Rebecca and Susannah's birth, Jacob Hagler had to be living in South Carolin in the late-1790s and early-1800s. In South Carolina there were three men named Jacob Hagler (or Haigler) living in South Carolina on the 1790 Census:  Jacob Hagler living in Camden District and Jacob Junior and Jacob Senior living in Orangeburgh District. Camden DistrictCamden District was abolished in 1791, which was made up of 7 Counties that included Lancaster County. All three Jacob's were living in South Carolina in 1800 and 1810 as recorded on the Census.

Jacob Senior and Jacob Junior Hagler of Orangeburgh were living in South Carolina in 1820 and 1830 as well as Junior in 1850. This I believe would preclude them from consideration, which will be made clearer below.

Jacob living in Lancaster District as recorded on the Census record for 1800 was (12010/0101000): one male under 10, two males 10-15, Jacob 26-44, one girl 10-15, and his wife 26-44). Since Susannah was born in 1800, she would not be included in the Census if she was born after August of 1800 and the reason she may not appear on this Census record. Are there other Haglers in 1800 that would fit the required profile?

District or CountyIn 1800, South Carolina finally eliminated all "overaching Districts" in favor of the smaller and more-manageable "county" system, but chose to give them all the name of "district" instead of county. Six new "districts" (counties) were created in 1800.



Analyzing the other Hagler Census records in Lancaster District in 1800, none have one or two girls under 10.

The 1810 Census for Jacob Hagler of Lancaster fits the correct profile (01010/02010/00) where he has two girls 10-15 years old living at home. There were a lot of Haglers living in Lancaster County and in Mecklenburg County right across the border in North Carolina during this period.

Jacob was a common name used by the Hagler families. The Jacob of Lancaster on the 1800 and 1810 Census is a strong candidate as he has the right number of girls, and disappeared from Lancaster after 1810.

3.

It is also possible that the Jacob we are looking for lives in another State and moved from SC in 1800.

a. If you expand the search for Jacob Hagler to other states in 1800, you find that there is a Jacob Hagler (52010/20101/03) living in Wilkes County, North Carolina in 1800 with the correct profile but there are deed records that show him living in Wilkes in 1787, and he was on the 1790 Census (12200) in Wilkes. Since Rebecca and Sussanah were born in South Carolina, I believe the fact he was in North Carolina throughout the 1790s would indicate that he is not their father.

b. There is a Jacob Hagler (14400) living in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, on the 1790 Census, which is close to the South Carolina border. There is also a John Hagler (23600) living in Mecklenburg in 1790 that is believed to be the father of Jacob (page 140, Residents of Mecklenburg County North Carolina 1762-1790 by Kathleen Marler). Looking at the 1800 Census in Mecklenburg, Jacob is not found, but John (21010/0101000) still lives in Mecklenburg in 1800 along with a Philip Hagler (20010/0010000). Where did Jacob go after the 1790 Census? One can assume he died or moved as he was not on 1800, 1810, 1820 Census of Mecklenburg. *See number 9 below for more analysis around this Jacob.

c. There is a Jacob (10301/0121000) and John (30110/1211000) Hagler living in Montgomery County, North Carolina in 1800. Montgomery County was created from Anson County in 1778. Both were still living in Montgomery in 1810 as J (Jacob) Hagler (01101/01000/10) and J (John) Hagler (30010/10010/00). John is believed to be the son of John & Elizabeth (Van Hooser) Hagler living in Anson County, North Carolina in 1776 and he later moved to Wilkes County, North Carolina. There is a Jacob Heglar (0101001000000/0101000100–) on the 1830 Census in West Side Pee Dee River, Montgomery County, North Carolina. This Jacob appears to be too young to be the Jacob on the 1800 Census and is believed to be the son of Jacob Hagler identified above in 1800 living in Montgomery County. The Jacob on the 1800 Census does not fit the profile that we are looking for in that in 1810 he has only one girl listed 10-15 where we should have two listed. It is possible the Census taker recorded the wrong number of girls. Also, for this to be the Jacob we are looking for, we still need to establish his move from South Carolina to Tennessee before or right after the 1800s. This Jacob is believed to be the Jacob on the 1820 and 1830 Census in Georgia and is believed to be the son of John Hagler Senior who settled on Dutch Buffalo Creek in 1765 and died by 1772.

d. There is a Jacob Haigler Junior (124007) living in Orangeburg District, South Carolina in 1790. In Orangeburg we have Jacob Senior (111014) and Peter (221005) living close to Jacob Junior. Both Haigler’s had Census records in Orangeburg in 1820, and 1830. Since they were still living in South Carolina iin 1830, this would preclude them being the Jacob Hagler we are looking for.

e. Based on Rebecca Ann (Overton) Hill, see number 9 below, Jacob (Jake) lived in Tennessee before his move to Georgia. She identified him as Jake of Tennessee. We have a problem in that there does not exist any Census records from Tennessee during that period as they were destroyed for the 1790, 1800, 1810 Census years. Parial Census records for Tennessee are available starting in 1820. On the 1820 Census records is listed a John L. Hagler (100110/10100/0500/200/00000/0—) living in Steward County, Tennessee. He is 26-45 years old. Steward County was created in 1803 from Davison County. I don’t believe this John is John Junior of Mecklenburg as he is too young based on this record, but if you look at the 1830 Census record (000200001–/00110001–) in Stewart County, his age is listed as 60-70 and this could put him within the age range of John Hagler Junior. There appears to be a mistake in the Census record either the 1820 or 1830 record. However, John Senior and Junior (as Heglar) are both on the Cabarrus County, North Carolina 1830 Census. Therefore, this John in Steward must be another John, maybe John of Montogmery, or one of the sons of the Lancaster bunch.

4.

If one looks at the 1830 Census in Stewart County, Tennessee, there is a John Hagler (000200001–/00110001–) listed as 60-70 years old. In the same County is another John J. Hagler (000010–/1001–) who is 20-30 years old and probably the son of the previous John who is 60-70. This makes sense if you look at the 1820 Census in Stewart where you have a John L. Hagler (100110/10100/05002—) listed as 26-45 with one male 16-26 that fits the John J. profile in 1830. There is another John Hagler (0210101000000/201201000000) living in Roane County, Tennessee.

There was a John Hagler who served in the War of 1812 in Brown’s Regiment, East Tennessee militia, as a private. This could be the John Hagler in (i) above on the 1830 Census as he would be 42-52 in 1812 as well as the John in Roane County. John was in the same regiment as an Abraham Hagler. There is an Abram Heagler living in Wayne County, Tennessee in 1830 on the Census (0000000010000/00000000100-). He is 50-60 years old and could have served in the War of 1812. Wayne County is about 110 miles south of Steward County and about 230 miles southwest of Roane County.

5.

Next, I would like to return to Jacob Hagler of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina and establish who was his father? Recorded in the book, Residents of Mecklenburg County NC 1762-1790, there lived a John (I’ll call him John Senior from now own) and Barbara Hagler in Mecklenburg who had two boys: John (a cripple-club foot) and Jacob. John, the cripple and I will call him Junior from now on, married a Catherine Sides and they had six children: Peter, Henry, Leonard, Jacob, Charles, and John. The book also states that John Senior estate was probated in 1772. John Junior witnessed a deed in 1780 and 1783 and bought land in 1786. He was on the Census in 1790 and 1800. Based on the 1800 Census, witness on the deeds (had to be at least 14-16), and when John Senior died, we can estimate John Junior’s birth between 1756 and 1764. This is supported by the 1800 Census of the John (21010/0101000) listed in Mecklenburg where his age is 26-44, or 1756-1774. John Junior would have married the earliest around 1776-1784. On the 1790 Census he had one son over 16 and two under 16 and 5 daughters of any age. If he had a son over 16, then he would have had to marry before 1784, which supports the previous dates of 1776-1784. All of this is to establish who the Jacob was on the 1790 Census. Since John Junior’s son Jacob would have been born at the earliest 1776, he is too young to have a family in 1790. Therefore I believe that the Jacob on the 1790 Census would have been John Senior’s son and therefore John Junior’s brother. This would mean that Jacob of Mecklenburg was born before 1772. Phillip Hagler is believed to be the brother of Jacob and John Hagler. This is important because this Jacob could also be the Jacob on the 1800/1810 Census in Lancaster District, South Carolina.

Based on an article in the Arkansas Democrat dated 30 Oct 1921, Rebecca Ann (Overton) Hill, daughter of John Overton Junior, stated that her grandfather on her mother’s side, Jake Hagler of Tennessee, played the fiddle at 112, which I believe is an important time indicator for establishing Jacob’s records. Combine this with another article about Rebecca (Hagler) Overton, wife of James Overton, stated that she and her sister, Susannah lived in Tennessee before moving to Georgia, where they married the Overton boys. Based on this recorded record, I believe you have to assume that before moving to Georgia that Jacob (Jake) was in Tennessee. The question is when did he moved to Georgia: before 1817 when his daughters married in Jasper County, Georgia, or when he appeared on the Georgia Census in 1840.

6.

When looking at the different Census records in Georgia, you need to keep in mind the following County boundary changes.

a. Walton County was created from Jackson County on Dec. 15, 1818 from the Creek lands.

b. Newton County was created from Jasper, Morgan, and Walton Counties in 1821. Parts of Newton County was added to Jasper in 1822, 1834 (repealed 1841) and 1850, a part of Walton County was added in 1820/21. Part of Jasper County was set off to Morgan County in 1815, part to Newton County in 1821.

c. Henry County was organized by an act of the legislature approved Dec. 24, 1821. Portions of Henry County were created from Walton County (1821) and the Creek Lands (1821). Also portions of Henry was created from Newton (1821), DeKalb (1822), Butts (1825), Spalding (1851), Clayton (1858), and Rockdale (1870) Counties.

7.

The Jacob Hagler on the 1820 Census in Walton County, GA (see bullet 5 above) is assumed to be the father of Rebecca and Susannah based on proximity to the Overtons in Walton County and the marriage to the Overton boys in 1817 in Jasper County. We also have Jacob still in the same area in 1830 but now in Henry County on the 1830 Census (0001000010000/000000001–). Henry County was created from part of Walton County. His age was 60-70 and his wife’s age is 60-70. However, the connection to Rebecca and Susannah is now in question based on the Cagle letters (see 14 below). It appears that this Hagler was married to an Elizabeth Cagle, the sister of Daivd Cagle who also lived in Henry in 1820. The Cagles are from Montgomery County, North Carolina as the letter (see 14 below) implies. The letter is from his brother Benjamin Cagle living in Montgomery County, North Carolina. We had assumed that Jacob’s wife died after 1830 and that he remarried before 1840 and was believed to be the Jacob on the Cobb County 1840 Census with his new wife Kizziah Thomas (born about 1803). Jacob was listed as age 60-70 and his wife as 40-50 on this Census. The problems is that on the 1830 Census he is also listed as 60-70, which indicates either an error by the Census taker or these are two different Jacob Haglers. Based on the facts of the letter, it is believed that we are talking about two different Jacob Haglers. If this is the case, then Jacob and Elizabeth could have died, or moved, after 1830 and before the 1840 Census.

Jacob Hagler married in January of 1837 and was on the 1840 Census in Cobb County, Georgia listed as age 60-70 with his wife, age 50-60. In 1850, Jacob, age 85 born in South Carolina, is living in Murray County, Georgia with his new wife listed as Keziah, age 45. They were again listed on the 1860 Census in Gordon County, Gerogia. His age was 92 born South Carolina and she was 57 born Georgia. Jacob died before the 1870 Census as Kizzah appears alone on the 1870 Census in Gordon County, Georgia. These records would imply that the statements made by Rebecca Hill (Overton) Hill to the Arkansas Democrat about him playing the fiddle at 112 should be adjusted to say 102. Since Jacob lived to such a ripe old age based on Rebecca’s comments, he was born in South Carolina based on the Census Records, and he is of the right age, I believe there is enough circumstantial evidence to say that the Jacob Hagler in Cobb (1840), Murray (1850) and Gordon (1860) Counties was the father of Rebecca and Susannah.

8.

The Cagle letters raise questions about who is the Jacob in Walton (1820) and Henry (1830) County. The letters from Benjamin Cagle of Montgomery County, North Carolina, to David Cagle of Henry County, Georgia in 1826 clearly establishes the fact that Jacob Hagler married Elizabth Cagle of Montgomery County, North Carolina and is living near David Cagle in Georgia. The Jacob mentioned in the letters is married to Elizabeth Cagle, daughter of George Cagle of Montgomery County, North Carolina. There is only one Jacob Hagler living in Georgia in 1830 and that is in Henry County, which is the same county as the Cagles. It has to be assumed that this Jacob is the Jacob Hagler listed on the 1790 Census in Montgomery. If this is true, then this implies that Jacob moved from Montgomery County, North Carolina sometime after the 1810 Census as he was recorded on the 1800 and 1810 Census in Montgomery County and settled in Gerogia before the 1820 Census.

Two letters on the Cagle forum at http://genforum.genealogy.com indicate the relationship between the people in the letter: Rebecca Cagle (wife of George Cagel), Benjamin Cagle (son of George Cagle), David Cagle (son of George Cagle), Elizabeth (Cagle) Hagler (daughter of George Cagle), and Jacob Hagler (husband of Elizabeth (cagle) Hagler).

9.

I believe we have established that the father of Rebecca and Susannah lived in South Carolina in the late 1790s and early 1800s where he had two daughters and then moved to Tennessee for a period of time before moving to Georgia where his daughters married the Overton boys in 1817. When you look at the Census record of Jacob Hagler of Lancaster District, South Carolina in 1800 and 1810 you find that the records fit the profile of our Jacob. He has one daughter in 1800 and two daughters in 1810 of the right age to be married in 1817. If this is the correct Jacob, then he had to move shortly after the 1810 Census to Tennessee for a few years before moving to Georgia. The move to Georgia was probably due to the offer of free land as this was also the hopes of a lot of pioneers that moved into Tennessee in the early 1800s. The question has to be asked if the John Hagler of Tennessee in 1820 is related to Jacob, the father of Rebecca and Susannah, did he move from Stewart County, Tennessee where John lived? I believe we have to accept the statements of Rebecca Ann (Overton) Hill, daughter of John Overton Junior, and Rebecca (Hagler) Overton, wife of James Overton, two separate collaborating statements, that Jacob lived in Tennessee before moving to Georgia. This means we are looking for a Jacob Hagler who lived in South Carolina in the late-1790s/early-1800s and moved to Tennessee before moving to Georgia. I believe we have to establish this as a basic axiom and try to fit our hypothesis around these timeframes.

We have two scenarios to work from based on whether the Jacob Hagler on the 1830 Henry County Census is a different Jacob than on the 1840 Cobb County Census, or they are the same person. One other piece of information we need to consider is the children listed on the 1820 and 1830 Census. On the 1820 Census Jacob had one son and one daughter under 10 years old. The daughter disappears from the 1830 Census and may have died since she was so young. The son is listed as 15-20 years old. Based on the age of the children and Elizabeth’s age on the 1830 Census, Elizabeth would have given birth at 40-55 years old. On the 1820 Census she is listed as 45 years of age or older and the boy is listed as less than 10 years old, which implies that if she was just 45 in 1820, the minimum age, she would have at least been 35-39 years old when she gave birth to the boy. Putting the 1820 and 1830 estimates together, we arrive at an age of 39/40 when she gave birth to the boy listed on the 1820 and 1830 Census. This would put the birth year of the boy around 1789/1790. Looking at the 1840 Census records in GA for a Hagler, we have an Abram Hagler living in Troup County (0000000100000/00010010000–) who is near to the correct age, but Abram was living in Troup County in 1830. On the 1850 Census record of Heard County, which was established by an Act of the General Georgia Assembly in 1831 from parts of Carroll, Coweta, and Troup Counties, Abram is listed as 64 years old (1786) and born in South Carolina and his wife Mary is listed as 60 years old and born in South Carolina. I believe this is the son of Jacob of Lancaster District, South Carolina. There is a Phillip Hagler on the 1840 Census (1100100000000/1000100000–) in Talbot County, Georgia who is 20-30 years old. Phillip does not appear on earlier Census in Georgia but does appears on the 1860 Census in Marion County, Georgia where he is listed as age 47, born 1813, in North Carolina. Phillip could be the son of Jacob Hagler of Montgomery County, North Carolina, who is listed on the 1820 and 1830 Census.

On the 1840 Census we find a Paul Hageler (0000000010000/00000000010–) living next to John Overton Junior. This Paul is 60-70 years old and would be old enough to have lived in South Carolina when John Senior lived there but proof as to his birth place is not possible as he appears to have died before the 1850 Census. There were two Paul Helgers living in Lancaster District, South Carolina in 1800 and both Paul’s are of the same age but one (10110/0001000) fits better the 1840 record based on his wife’s age. For example, his wife was 70-80 (1760-1770) in 1840 and was 26-44 (1756-1774) in 1800, which implies that she was born 1760-1770. This Paul would have been born 1770-1780, which better fits the profile of the Paul Hagler on the 1800, 1810, and 1820 Census in Lancaster. It also fits the profile of Paul Hagler in the 1840 Census for Fayette County, Georgia. There is a Paul Hagler (0000000010000/000000000100-) in Campbell County, Georgia in 1830 but this Census has his age as 60-70 and his wife’s age as 70-80, which is the same as the 1840 Census. Paul received the land through the Georgia Cherokee Land Lottery of 1832 (Number 201, District: 7th District, 1st Section, Cherokee, Residence: Woodruff’s, County: Campbell). It appears Paul left South Caroina and moved to Georgia to take advantage of the land lottery. He probably lived with someone for a few years to establish himself as a Georgia resident and to qualify for the Georgia lottery. Paul disappeared from South Carolina in 1820, so it is possible that the Paul on the 1830 Census in Campbell is the same Paul. John Overton Junior also lived in Campbell County, Georgia in 1830.

a. This Paul is of the right age to have been the son of the John Hagler who received land on Dutch Buffalo Creek in 1765 and died in 1772. If this is the case, then Paul would have been born 1770-1772. Paul sold land in 1817 in Lancaster County, South Carolina and his wife’s name was Elizabeth.

b. It is possible that Paul is the son of Jacob Hagler of Montogmery County, North Carolina but do not have the data to support this theory.

c. The relationship between Susannah (Hagler) Overton who was born 1800 and Paul who was born 1770-1780 and due to the age difference, about 20+ years, Paul is more than likely her uncle.

i. Jacob’s 1810 Census in Lancaster list his son’s age 10-15 and his daughter’s age 10-15, which implies that these children were born within 5 years of each other. If the Jacob Hagler on the 1800 Census in Lancaster is the same Jacob as on the 1810 Census, he has 4 children listed with the oldest male 10-15. This would imply that his oldest child on this Census was born after 1785 but before 1790, which is too young to be Paul.

ii. Jacob was born about 1768 based on the Georgia Census records, which means he could have married at the earliest 1786-1789. His oldest child on the 1800 Census is estimated to be born 1785-1790, and more than likely 1786-1789. Based on this, we can assume with some confidence that Paul was not Susannaha’s brother, but more than likely her uncle.

iii. Can the Jacob Hagler of Montogmery County be Paul’s father? Jacob had three sons age 16-25 in 1800. This would imply that their birth dates could fall between 1775 and 1784, which falls within Pau’s birth dates of 1770-1780, so it is possible.

d. Overton’s receiving land in the 1832 Georgia lottery was Abijah (Newton County) and James (Henry County) and there was also an Arnold (Walton County) and a Thomas (Taliaferro County) Overton. Abraham Haglar received land in Troup County in the 1827 Georgia lottery along with an Aaron S. Overton receiving land in Lee County and Gilcrest Overton in Troup County. John Overton Senior and James Overton received land in the 1820 Georgia Land Lottery.

10.

Abram Hagler living in Heard County, Geogria in 1850 is of the age to be the son of Jacob Hagler of Lancaster County, South Carolina. On the 1850 Census he was listed as 64 years of age, or born about 1786, in South Carolina. Mary Hagler is identified as his wife; age 60 and born in South Carolina. He is listed as a farmer. The following is an attempt to track this Abram back in time.

a. Going back to the 1800 Census in South Carolina, there is an Abram Hagler on the 1800 Census of Lancaster County who is 26-44 with a wife 45 and older. There are three children listed (one boy under 10 and one 26-44 and one girl 16-25). On the 1810 Census of Lancaster County, Abram is over 45 years old. He has four children (one boy and three girls under 10) and one woman 16-25 living with him. He disappears from the 1820 Census but there is a younger Abram on the Census who is 16-26, born 1794-1804, with a wife 16-26 with one girl under 10. The older Abram disappeared from the Lancaster Census before 1820 and the younger one disappeared after 1820. Did the older Abram die or move and if he moved and the younger also moved, where did they go?

b. There is an Abraham Haigler on the 1830 Census in Captain John B Stong Township, Troup County, Geogria listed with his wife as 30-40 years old with two girls, ages 5-10 and 10-15. This would be the Abraham Haglar who received land in Troup County in the 1827 Georgia Land Lottery. He is listed again on the 1840 Census in Troup County, Geogria and listed as 50-60 years old with a wife 40-50 years old with one child listed as 15-20. This Abram would be born 1780-1790, which is in the age range of the Abram we are tracking and believed to be the same Abram as above described in item 16 above.

c. Looking for Abram (Abraham) in 1830 living outside of South Carolina and Georgia, we find two Abrams, one living in Ross County, Ohio (1112001000000/0001010–), age 40-50, born 1780-1790, and one (named Abraham) living in Wayne County, Tennessee (He and his wife are 60-70 years old, born 1760-1770, with no children). The Abram in Ohio fits the correct age but do not believe he is the Abram in Lancaster in 1800.

11.

James Overton was in the GA militia (Wimberly’s 3rd Regiment) and served in the War of 1812. John Overton Junior also served in the War of 1812. John Junior married Susannah Hagler in November of 1817 a couple years after the war in Jasper County. James followed suite shortly afterwards marring Susannah’s older sister Rebecca Hagler in December of 1817 also in Jasper County. John Junior was on the 1820 Census in Walton County (200100/11100010–), which was created from the Creek Lands in 1818 and part of the Georgia Land Lottery. John Junior did not receive this land through the Lottery; at least I cannot find any such records. John Senior and his son James Overton received land in Walton County through the 1821 Georgia Land Lottery and were on the 1820 Census in Walton County. John Senior lived about 52 families from John Junior (Senior was listed near the bottom of page 258 of the Census and Junior at the bottom of page 260). It is possible that John Junior lived at the opposite end of John Senior’s property and separated such that they would be counted apart on the Census, but this is pure speculation. How did John Junior get the property: did he buy it from someone who won a piece of property but then sold it, did his father carve out a piece of his property and give it to him, or did John Junior win the Lottery but not appear on any Lottery list? John lives next to Elizabeth Day (000100/00101/010). John Senior’s youngest daughter, Mary, married a William Day. There were several Haglers that served in the Georgia militia in the War of 1812.

a. Private Garland Hagler serving in the 3rd Regiment (Wimberly’s) with James Overton.

b. Private David Hagler serving in Wootton’s detachment.

c. Private John Hagler serving in the 2nd Regiment (Thomas).

12.

Susannah and Rebecca’s father, Jacob Hagler, is not to found in Georgia records throughout the 1820s and 30s. This assumes that the Jacob on the 1820 and 1830 Census in Walton County is not him. Jacob appeared in the records of Geogia in January of 1837 when he married Kizziah Thomas, born 1780-1790, in Georgia and appeared next in the 1840 Census in Cobb County, Geogria and again in Gordon County, Georgia with Kizziah when he was 92 and she was 57. It is assumed that he died before the 1850 Census as no records of him can be found, or he could have been living with someone due to his advanced age. His age would support the recollections of Rebecca Ann Hill in the Arkansas Democrat. Based on the stories in the Arkansas Democrat, we know Jacob lived in Tennessee before 1817 but since his daughters married in Georgia, he was probably in Georgia before marring in 1837. If he worked as a laborer and did not own land, he would not be listed by name on any Census record before 1850. It is probable that he was in Georgia duing the period his daughters married and up and until he appeared in an offical record with his marriage..

 It appears that Paul Hagler, who could be Jacob’s brother, moved to Georgia in the 1830s from South Carolina to take advantage of the Georgia Land Lottery where he won a piece of land in Campbell County in 1832. Campbell County was created from Carroll and Coweta Counties in 1828. Paul sold the land and bought land adjacent to John and Susannah Overton who also had moved from Campbell to Fayette County, Georgia by 1840. Paul disappeared from Fayette by the next Census in 1850, and it is assumed he died before the 1850 Census. It is also assumed that Abram moved to Georgia from South Carolina for the same reason as Paul, which was to obtain land in the Georgia lottery. He won a piece of land in Troup County in the same 1832 lottery as Paul. It would appear that Paul and Abram moved from South Carolina together to take advantage of the 1832 Georgia Land Lottery. They would have had to move to Georgia by 1829 to be eligible for the drawing because of the 3 year residency requirement. Paul sold the land in Campbell County soon after winning it in the lottery and moved to Fayette County. He bought a piece of land next door to John Overton Junior in Fayette County. John also had sold his land in Campbell County where he lived as of the 1830 Census and moved to Fayette County. Both were identified on the 1840 Census living next to each other. Based on this, it is probable that Paul, Abram and Susannah were related.

Login/Logout Form